• Ali Silverstein - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
    Installation View / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
    Installation View / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
    Installation View / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
    Installation View / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Fortuna / Ali Silverstein
    Fortuna / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Fortuna, closer / Ali Silverstein
    Fortuna, closer / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Olympic - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
    Olympic - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein -
  • Ali Silverstein - Installation View / Ali Silverstein
    Installation View / Ali Silverstein
  • Ali Silverstein - Overland / Ali Silverstein
    Overland / Ali Silverstein

LA’s Fine (The Sun Shines Most of the Time)

Inga Gallery is pleased to introduce new works of Ali Silverstein.  For her inaugural show at the gallery, Silverstein will present recent work from her new studio in Los Angeles.

These “scapes”—large-scale constructions of painted and layered canvas attached with thread or glue – are named after streets in LA.  But none represent physical “reality” —none depict a particular place or street—but rather each work, and more broadly, the new collection, are abstractions – crystallized echoes of a sense of place.

Each work is a place—light, structure, space, feeling tone—where one might, for an instant or a lifetime, locate himself.

Like visual haiku, fragments and fugues of scallops and fringe, pieces of mountain range and architectural curve, are abstracted and recontextualized not as mere landscape, but as inner-scape, or culture-scape – where the inner meets the outer.

Her process is guided by whatever feels necessary: cutting vertical strips in the canvas to create long tassels; sticking shapes of canvas onto her paintings, or, in other work, painting over these shapes and then removing them, leaving the residue of triangles and arcs. 

Rough-hewn yet poised, there is a feeling of necessity in the making of Silverstein’s work – an edgy immediacy in its construction.  The works themselves suggest an endlessness of options.  Like a Polaroid, they seem to say, “I am only a moment.  We have only happened to stop here.  There are a multitude of other options, and a continuous becoming.”